Top 16 Ghost Towns In Manitoba

Next time you are ready for a road trip in Manitoba, consider visiting one of these ghost towns.

Some may have residents living there so be considerate and remember that even if they appear to be abandoned buildings, someone may own them.

Manitoba Ghost Towns

Bradwardine, MB – A neat town with a grain elevator and an old bank vault.

Bradwardine, MB

Cardale, MB – A whole bunch of buildings to shoot including a neat school.

 
Cardale, MB

Isabella, MB – Grain elevators, church, and a couple other buildings.

Isabella, MB

Elva, MB – What makes this town so neat is the 2 unique older style grain elevators.

Elva, MB

Griswold, MB – Right along the trans-Canada highway, this town has a nice variety of buildings to shoot.

Griswold, MB
 

Harding, MB – Has a neat garage and store.

Harding, MB

Holmfield, MB – Barely a ghost town, but the buildings are so cool and not in use anymore.

Holmfield, MB by Misheyla Iwasiuk https://twitter.com/MisheylaIwasiuk

Kirkella, MB – Not much to see, but the church is worth it!

Kirkella, MB

Lauder, MB – Was recently the eeriest ghost town in Manitoba, but I heard that some buildings were torn down.

Lauder, MB

Lenore, MB – An amazing grain elevator and old gas station.

Lenore, MB

Lyleton, MB – Old grain elevator, and some old stores. Neat place!

Lyleton, MB

McConnell, MB – A really neat church and a grain elevator make this place worth visiting.

From C Pangman – I grew up on a farm 6 miles east of one of them. McConnell. In 1942 when I was 6 yrs old I counted up the people living in McConnell. There were 42 at that time. The town had a general store, two service stations, blacksmith, two grain elevators, railway station, an active town hall, open air rink, a Manitoba baseball Hall of Fame team, a United Church minister who played the bag pipes, and the school in the picture was bright and shiny.
The train came on Mondays and Fridays and brought the mail and groceries for the store. That’s when most of us farm kids, and some who lived in town, got together for games, running on top of the parked box cars, skating in winter, going to concerts and dances in the hall, and church on Sundays. The church mentioned was brought in from some 15 miles away after ours burned down in the early 50s. Sad day.

McConnell, MB School

Napinka, MB – Great church, grain elevators and other buildings.

Napinka, MB

Ruthenia, MB – Neat buildings and church highlight this town.

Ruthenia, MB – By Manitoba Historical Society

Snowflake, MB – Grain elevators and lots of buildings.

Grain Elevators at Snowflake, Manitoba

Tilston, MB – A pair of grain elevators and the main street is filled with abandoned bliss.

Tilston, MB

 

By Chris Attrell

8 Replies to “Top 16 Ghost Towns In Manitoba”

  1. Can we go inside theys building to look around ? I sure wouldn’t to travel around Manitoba if I only get to take pictures of the outside I want the stories of the inside

  2. Hi Chris : Want to thank you for your coverage and images of Manitoba ghost towns. I grew up on a farm 6 miles east of one of them. McConnell. In 1942 when I was 6 yrs old I counted up the people living in McConnell. There were 42 at that time. The town had a general store, two service stations, blacksmith, two grain elevators, railway station, an active town hall, open air rink, a Manitoba baseball Hall of Fame team, a United Church minister who played the bag pipes, and the school in the picture was bright and shiny.
    The train came on Mondays and Fridays and brought the mail and groceries for the store. That’s when most of us farm kids, and some who lived in town, got together for games, running on top of the parked box cars, skating in winter, going to concerts and dances in the hall, and church on Sundays. The church mentioned was brought in from some 15 miles away after ours burned down in the early 50s. Sad day.
    Each of those ghost towns can boast a similar vibrant history, rich past, and memories of numerous youngsters who served and died in two world wars. What an experience of life was provided by every one of those phenomenal communities.
    I am so proud to have grown up in one of them. Thank you for the memories, Chris.

  3. I grew up in the Tilston area, lived in the town for a year and went to school there all my life. When we lived in Tilston in 53-54 there were about 120, or more people living in town. Tuesday and Friday night were train night and everyone came to town. The pool room was filled with men, the little post office was lined with women, waiting for 7:00 when the wicket would open and they could get their mail. There were two grocery stores, two garages, cafe, two churches, school from 1-11, R.M . Office, post office, station agent and section Forman. The. community hall was a busy center with various events. Plus all the farmers hauled all their grain to town to the elevators

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